Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Reflection on the Road To Emmaus; Walking with The Christ/Spirit…

April 13, 2015 - 2:06 pm Comments Off on Reflection on the Road To Emmaus; Walking with The Christ/Spirit…

Remembering that we are not human beings on a spiritual journey but spiritual being on a human journey… and that the intent and experience of the journey is more important than the final destination, we have today’s Scriptural reading…

The Gospel according to St. Luke Chapter 24: 13-26; 30-32

Now on that same day, two of them were going to the village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and they were talking with each other about the things that had happened.

While they were talking, Jesus himself came near and walked with them, but their eyes were kept from recognizing him. Jesus asked them what they were talking about, and they stopped, stood still and looked sad. Then one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answered. :Are you the only one who does not know the things that have taken place? Jesus asked, “What things?”

They both replied, ‘ The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed, and word before God, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be crucified.: we thought he would be the hope, the one who would redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things took place. Moreover, some of the women of our group astonished us. They were at his tomb early in the morning, and when they couldn’t find his body there and told us they saw a vision of angels who said he was alive!

Then Jesus said to them, ” Oh, how foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have declared! Was it not necessary for the Messiah should suffer these things, and then enter into glory?

When they were at the table, Jesus took the bread, blessed it and broke it, and gave it to them, that their eyes were opened and they recognized him, …

And they said, “Did not our hearts burn within us while he was talking with us on the road, while he was opening up the Scriptures to us?”

Homily: Walking With The Christ/Spirit Within

As spiritual people, We are also Easter people… And that the effects of “eastering”- the living, dying, and becoming alive again- that are at the core of our daily faith; This growth, this hope accompanies us throughout all of our life’s travels and travails, and as Unity teaches us, there is a Christ/Spirit that lives in us, and it resides at center of the purpose for our lives…

Like the disciples on the Road to Emmaus, we don’t always recognize what is good for us, or welcome God even when divine truth is in our midst. Our human tendencies make us balk; turn arrogant or become deaf. Until the grace and truth that is in Christ is broken in the bread- that is, revealed to us- can we begin to explore, explain, and experience the true value of having Christ as our companion in our journey through life….

We live each day as people who carry with us the threat of reversal and wrong turns, and as people who carry within us the hope of the resurrection and faithfulness; for any of us, our inner comprehension of God can be asleep or active, passive or present, dead or alive in each day of our existence.

What continues on for us as the rest of the Easter story is the abiding truth that God can arise and offer us grace and insight from our trials, our pain, our personal losses.

Now stop and think… Has there ever been a time in your life when all the advice or information you received didn’t seem to help? Were you like Cleopas, so involved in denial, so wrapped up in a false dream, or defending your own ego negativity, that you were unwilling to change?

In any “doom and gloom” thinking, we can miss whatever wisdom and insight there is in a situation that will eventually release or free us… By our faith, we are made strong enough to release the past, change the present, and prepare for the future….

Through our prayers, we can ask to possess enough courage, and have sufficient love to overcome any halting steps or worrisome fears. And that our goal as metaphysical Christians is to be willing to walk on…

to carry the weight… and most importantly to know that we do not walk alone, and that God’s guidance, mercy, and truth will accompany us, bless us, and carry us through whatever trials and experiences our lives contain.

Similar to the lesson of the disciples walking toward Emmaus, what is of supreme importance is that there is available to each and everyone of us:

That there is a spiritual presence, a divine effect or energy, an indwelling Holy Spirit that can awakens us, that will challenge, transform, and heal us…

and it is through that energy, intuition, or influence, that we are given assurance that we can overcome our feelings of distance, time, hurt or injustice in ways that increases our understanding, and in ways that will restore our memory of what is sacred, loving, and true.

This is a story of how the power and presence of Christ within us and continually walks alongside us, even at our saddest most troubling times, for it is a Spirit of compassionate constancy that will accompany our grief with an unexpected promise, as a quiet, courageous grace.

As this Gospel story concludes, the mystery of the stranger is revealed- through the power of their perception, his presence became real, and the blessings of a life in Christ became recalled and reenacted in the breaking of the bread.

What these disciples experienced was the recognition, in their burning hearts, that the despair and sorrow that they felt could be transformed into inspiration and joy, and that God’s Spirit would always be walking with them!

However you might perceive or comprehend it, it is my sincere belief that God can become known to us in many ways- from a quick insight to life transforming love, from a deep visceral experience of “a burning heart”-

each sign of God’s presence and activity in your life is a sign of a gracious spiritual connection, or soulful companionship, of something one feels that is far greater than oneself, yet closer to you than your breath…

What the story of Emmaus gives me is consolation and hope… That in the midst of our trials, we can learn to transform any acute or lingering sorrow into a lively joy.

However, it takes our willingness to move, to risk, to open ourselves up to God’s presence. We have to push our egos away, to make room to let God inside, and in that welcoming of the Spirit, we make ourselves ready and aware; willing to experience the wisdom and compassion that is strong, resilient, and ever-present to us.

When we walk with the metaphysical Christ, we walk as a holy person, filled with promise and hope- we are enlivened, enriched, and we are ever more grateful for the blessings we have already received.

Despite the demands and the difficulties of living a more God-connected or inspired life, I wholeheartedly recommend the journey, and I wish you well…

Blessings! Bon Voyage! AMEN

 

Mandalas And Their meanings

March 22, 2015 - 3:49 pm Comments Off on Mandalas And Their meanings

A Preface to Charleston’s Tibetan Cultural Week:

The Meaning of Mandalas

The Unity Community of Mt. Pleasant, SC

March 22, 2015

The ancient teachings and practices associated with Buddhism, are enjoying a sustained popularity no one would have predicted just 30 years ago. As mainline Christian churches shrink, Buddhism is one of the approaches to spirituality and life that has steadily grown and prospered in our country… And I would say, across the modern Western world.

Given that I would enjoy the possibility of teaching the concepts of Buddhism over a much longer time period and with a much more in depth outlook, I will not speak today about the origins of Buddhism, The Gautama, The spread Eastward in Asia, and the various kinds or schools of Buddhist thought and practice. Instead, I will choose to highlight what we are privileged to see and witness over this coming week- the arts and culture of Tibet and one of its chief tools for teaching spiritual awareness, the mandala.

What are some of the reasons for this influx of Tibetan teachers and the establishment of Buddhist study centers around the country?

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The first, and most obvious is that it is not Judeo-Christian! There are many people who were raised in traditional Western homes that have found themselves to either at odds with the teachings and precise of these faiths, Jewish, Catholic and Protestant, that they have left during their early adulthood in search of an understanding of life, the self, and the world that make greater sense to them than the way they had seen it practiced and understood in their childhood homes.

The second, seemingly startling reason that Buddhism, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular has grown in its appeal to Westerners is the fact that in Buddhism, there is no concept of a troublesome, capricious, personal God… In fact, even though elaborate in its symbolism and rituals, there is no theology or a God that stands apart!

The third one I will consider this morning that will be my theme, is the way Buddhism uses its signs, symbols, colors and designs to evoke meaning and to impel our thoughts and feelings towards the teachings of its core truths and principles. Of course, it does not hurt to have a series of delightful, grand fatherly and gentle teachers…

Chief among them is Tenzen Gayatso, the 14th or the current Dali Lama, who lives in India, but who could call the world his home.

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He is one of the individuals most responsible for the spread and popularity of Tibetan teachings, and he has assisted his people immensely by how well he lives and then conveys the teachings…

By most definitions, he would be a world saint, or an inspired teacher whose life is dedicated to wisdom, compassion, and kindness.

As a symbolic and complex teaching tool, the mandala can be seen as representing many things… At its most basic, it is a wheel, a circle or a circular depiction of the whole of life. In the blessing or transmission of the Kali Chakra, which is known as the wheel of time, the mandala represents the whole course of human existence: past, present, and future… That it symbolizes that which is completely within us, and that which is the nature of all that is beyond and yet includes us as spelled out in the last stanza of the Heart Sutra which proclaims a connection, an interdependence of consciousness that is not only beyond our normal waking mind, or beyond our caring heart; It is a supreme reality that is beyond, or refers to the beyond that is beyond the beyond! Gate’, Gate’. Parasam Gate Bohdi Svaha…,

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“Mandalas are far more than geometrical figures, however. For Tantric Buddhists, they are rich with symbolism and sacred meaning. In fact, the etymology of the word “mandala” suggests not just a circle but a “container of essence.”

Simply stated, a mandala is a sacred geometric figure that represents the universe. When completed, a mandala becomes a sacred area that serves as a receptacle for deities and a collection point of universal forces. By mentally entering a mandala and proceeding to its center, a person is symbolically guided through the cosmos to the essence of reality. By constructing a mandala, a monk ritually participates in the Buddha’s teachings.”

“Mandala Symbolism

In Buddhism, Mandalas are rich with symbolism that evokes various aspects of Buddhist teaching and tradition. This is part of what makes the creation of a mandala a sacred act, for as they work, the monks are imparting the Buddha’s teachings.

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Outside the square temple are several concentric circles. The outermost circle is usually decorated with stylized scrollwork resembling a ring of fire. This ring of fire symbolizes the process of transformation humans must undergo before being able to enter the sacred territory within. It both bars the uninitiated and symbolizes the burning of ignorance. ”

The next circle inward is a ring of thunderbolt or diamond scepters, which stands for indestructibility and illumination. This is followed by a circle of eight graveyards, representing the eight aspects of human consciousness that bind a person to the cycle of rebirth. Finally, the innermost ring is made of lotus leaves, signifying religious rebirth.

The square structure in the middle of a mandala is a palace for the resident deities and a temple containing the essence of the Buddha. The square temple’s four elaborate gates symbolize a variety of ideas, including: The four boundless thoughts: loving-kindness, compassion, sympathy and equanimity;

The four directions: south, north, east and west

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Within the square palace or temple are images of deities, which are usually the Five Dyani Buddhas (the Great Buddhas of Wisdom). The iconography of these deities is rich in symbolism in itself. Each of the Dyani Buddhas represents a direction (center, south, north, east and west), cosmic element (like form and consciousness), earthly element (ether, air, water, earth and fire), and a particular type of wisdom. Each Buddha is empowered to overcome a particular evil, such as ignorance, envy or hatred.

The Five Dyani Buddhas are generally identical in appearance, but are each represented iconographically with a particular color, mudra (hand gesture), and animal.

In the center of the mandala is an image of the chief deity, who is placed over the center dot described above. Because it has no dimensions, the center dot represents the seed or center of the universe.

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So, one of the core meanings of the mandala is a symbol of time;

Another is that the mandala represent the construction of reality, and as such, how consciousness is built, how it can be destroyed, how what is adamantine remains, and how that which is material, temporal, or subjective can be easily destroyed or lost.

Without getting too elaborate, the four main Buddhas guard the 4 gates of the mandala, warding off evil, desire, and distraction, thus protecting the wisdom that is to be found within, and the teachings that the mandala can contain for us.

While often considered to be a principal tool in teaching about the impermanence of life, and how clinging on to anything, anyone, any idea can prove to create suffering from this experience of attachment, the mandala and its dissolution teaches us the lessons of impermanence are not the only wisdom to that is found in its shapes and designs.

The other central teaching can be seen if you are willing to picture the mandala as a sky chart, and insight into the universe- as a cosmic pattern, or a celestial view of the totality of our existence…

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becomes our incentive to center or concentrate our lives on that which is transcendent, permanent, undying and everlasting:

Wisdom, truth, compassion, kindness… not anything built by human hands or given an arbitrary value by human culture.

Among the many things the mandala can represent for us is that as it is laid out, it becomes a container for our blessings… the multicolored sands are the textures of life and hues of our humanity.

As each grain of sand is added, it becomes for us , a visible prayer- a divine syllable that makes up the symphony and celebration of life.

Once complete, the mandala becomes for us a sacred design that blesses the whole environment because it can act as a blessing chamber, an alchemical crucible from which prayers take shape, and compassionate energies can flow… It becomes its own self sustaining energy source and becomes capable of being an instrument of healing and transformation.

It is said that wherever a mandala is created with devout sincerity, its presence will serve to elevate the aspirations, and intentions of the space it is in, the people who live or work, or in this pray there…

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Furthermore, it is an energy when it is agreed on, can foster spiritual growth and ethical change in the larger neighborhood or the greater surroundings.

So As you observe the mandala this week, try to see it through this more expansive view… Engage, as practically as possible, in the use of the group mandala as your own; and also as a focal point for any universal prayers, hopes, and intentions.

In this way, mandalas attest to the beneficial principle:

WHAT BLESS ONE, BLESSES ALL… AMEN

A Most Misunderstood Woman: Looking at Mary Magdalene ; Insights and Appreciation

March 8, 2015 - 8:02 am Comments Off on A Most Misunderstood Woman: Looking at Mary Magdalene ; Insights and Appreciation

 

A Most Misunderstood Woman: Mary Magdalene

Recalling an Extraordinary Woman and Saint from the Gospels and her own (?) Writings

The Unity Community of Mount Pleasant, SC

March 8, 2015

As I was rattling my brain, and going over the many ideas I could develop for a sermon during Lent and the Easter season, I realized that there is a true and unheralded story that needs to be told… The story of Mary Magdelene is one that can fully occupy our imagination, but cannot be understood only as religious history, or as a dissenting theology, but through her words as they are attributed to her in the Canonical Gospels and in the Gnostic Gospels that will provide us with a timeless example of living out one’s spiritual values.

Given that March is Women’s History Month, and that There is a lot of erroneous conclusions about her, I feel its time to lift her up as a courageous and inspirational feminine role model for the spiritual life.

When one looks thoroughly at the Scriptures, Mary of Magdala is specifically mentioned only once outside of the Resurrection story… But even that conclusion is an open-ended one! You see, there are five Marys in the Christian Testaments, and some are clear cut, such as Mary the mother of Jesus, but there are stories where it is quite unclear which Mary is being spoken of, or even if the woman in the story was a Mary of any sort!

Many scholars will speculate that Mary of Magdala was the Mary in the Lukan story of Mary and Martha; We are unsure if she might have been the woman who anointed Jesus’ feet with her tears, and it is a loose conclusion that identifies her as a the woman that Jesus healed from having seven devils within her… however… We are reasonably certain that she was NOT the woman caught in adultery, although that sin and the effects of that papal branding of her as a prostitute and grievous sinner lasted some 12 hundred years!

In the Gospel accounts, we are given indications of her qualities and outlooks on life… however, these are incomplete. When added to the Gnostic Gospel of Mary, we are given a few more insightful and truly surprising clues to a misunderstood, yet faithful and devoted disciple.

(Technically, she could be named as an Apostle, as the difference between an apostle and being a disciple is someone who had a direct living relationship with Jesus and/or someone who had a historical encounter with the risen Christ… such as Paul…)

To begin with, and something to keep in mind during this Lenten season, is that while celebrated only once a year, that our lives can be filled with Good Fridays and with Easter mornings. I would advance the idea that we cannot have a complete understanding of Holy in our lives unless we understand the how Good Friday and Easter teach us about the necessary and complementary steps each of us takes, or instruct the life changing experiences each of us has to live through that will serve to deepen our awareness of God and Spirit in our lives.

One of the most searing critiques of the New Age Spirituality Movement can be expressed by the desire to avoid Good Friday and only celebrate Easter. Genuine spiritual maturity or depth does not come to us easily, quickly, or cheaply. While you can have pleasant, uplifting episodes, and warm feelings from exercises and meditations, those do not constitute genuine spiritual discovery or depth. When I read about the lives of the saints, East and West, often there is a struggle they have to overcome, a deep personal flaw, a struggle against injustice, or an ego-defying love. The women of the Gospel, and maybe Mary of Magdela in particular, had to confront their Good Friday directly-vividly, and to endure it with nobility, courage and grace. Her story is different because there is a quality of an intimate connection that was neither maternal nor was it sisterly. IF we are to accept what the Gnostic Gospels such as Philip seem to infer, or what the novelists like Nicholas Kasinstakis in his work, The Last Temptation of Christ, and Dan Brown with his Da Vinci Code and similar speculative works, are offered to us as tantalizing possibilities. IF they are proved or considered to be true, then Mary was not only a devoted disciple, she was Jesus’ wife or spouse. Because of this intimacy, her Good Friday was different than a maternal or sisterly loss would be. A simple way to explain this controversial point of view would be that it was her lesson is how to live with loss, and then as a widow, teach others his truth and to follow his wisdom, while keeping the bond of love alive that exists between them.

Maybe that impulse, that hope and that desire to see him again was the great driving motive behind why she was the first one at the tomb- Yes, it was an act of strong faith, but it was also an act of a strong love that attests to the heart centered understanding that they shared… It was a deep understanding that the Gnostic Gospels refer to as Mary knowing the secrets and hidden teachings that Jesus never shared with anyone else.

In this more inspirational yet expansive appreciation of Mary, we come to understand her as an example of a timeless sense of love and the courageous dedication because to continue to spread and to fulfill his teachings. By doing that, she immediately was branded as a rebel and by doing so, she upset the patriarchal traditions that became so ingrained in the Western Church. One of the reasons why she was held captive in obscurity was she broke the cultural barriers to women in religious leadership in order to testify to a timeless truth of God being alive within each of us… (Son of Man = holy child of Humankind, or as Unity teaches it, The Christ within….)

Like the strange fact that we have no real idea what Jesus looked like, the same is true of Mary… We have only the artistic renderings from pious artists to use as our subjective measure… Some of those historical renderings show us a woman who Jesus saves from the angry, judgmental crowd, or show us a picture of a woman after being healed of seven demons… Others refer to Mary more quietly and less dramatically to her only as a close disciple who listened fully, and comprehended deeply.

Because of the misanthropic patriarchy winning the ecclesial battle for prominence, the important contributions of women to the Gospel and to the formation of the Early church were largely erased. This willful deletion, however, do not stop the Gnostics from adding their additional pieces to the puzzle, even if the pieces they offered did not easily fit or contribute to what was already known… By in large, women began to recede from their leadership and early prominence… If fact, they not only were forced into the background, they began to take on a more sinister importance. The skeptical old monks looked at women as the problem… Because they represented desire, and so they were, at best, a distraction to a more pious and pristine life… Then we have layered on that dubious notion, the beliefs about Eve as the originator of sin, and thanks to the Pope Gregory in 591, we have Mary identified as a prostitute!

Of course, we have absolutely NO evidence that Mary was anything but a sincere student and maybe even a beloved disciple… It was a massive error of great consequence that has haunted women and Western spirituality ever since!

The latest, reliable scholarship that would be trustworthy depicts Mary, and the Gnostic Gospel attributed to her, as having a genuine case to be named an apostle, and thereby breaking down much of the old conclusions about the growth of the Christian church and women’s roles in its seeding and planting. In the Gospel of Mary she is seen having prominence, if not preeminence because she possesses knowledge that was kept from the other disciples, and that she was charged to share it with them during the early time period after Jesus’ ascension/disappearance….

When we add to this teaching, the historical fact of its origins, it has to be given a much larger standard of credence as the time period would be roughly parallel to the writing of the Gospel of John. Thomas is set a little earlier, scholars suggest that it was written during the time of Luke/Acts, and before John. From a historical evaluation, Thomas and Mary would have to be accepted as being more genuine because they were earlier than all the rest of the Gnostics… (See research by Karen King for a full and rich explanation)

So let us turn to what her story could reveal… That her message that we have been able to translate and study give us parts left unread by the conventional Christian and that have been largely ignored by mainline teachings… While we could go overt the texts that we have been given by orthodoxy, I would prefer to open your thought and inform your hearts by turning our attention to the search for greater wisdom and understanding that these Gnostic texts can offer us…. Unfortunately, what has been preserved for us is but a fraction of the whole book… We are missing substantial parts and can only hope more might be found, but realistically having to content ourselves that these fragments can still contribute to expanding our understanding of Jesus’ timeless wisdom…

Chapter 4

(Pages 1 to 6 of the manuscript, containing chapters 1 – 3, are lost.

The extant text starts on page 7…)

. . . Will matter then be destroyed or not?

22) The Savior said, “All nature, all formations, all creatures exist in and with one another, and they will be resolved again into their own roots.

23) For the nature of matter is resolved into the roots of its own nature alone.

24) He who has ears to hear, let him hear”.

All that exists, first exists in the realm of an image or an idea…, It takes shape or becomes physical because it follows its unique pattern for manifestation… And at its death or demise, returns to that original , radical or root image or idea… This is not merely a law of reincarnation, nor is it just the physics of energy that always is changing… What is being suggested here is that there is a return to the essence that holds its cosmic blueprint.

Everything that has been created has a design or a blueprint that maps out its essence, its construction of its reality.

25) Peter said to him, Since you have explained everything to us, tell us this also: What is the sin of the world?

26) The Savior said There is no sin, but it is you who make sin when you do the things that are like the nature of adultery, which is called sin.

27) That is why the Good came into your midst, to the essence of every nature in order to restore it to its root.

As it has been explained, here Jesus offers us a transformative statement about the nature of sin that has been totally by-passed or absurdly reduced to the idea that a mistake, a moral flaw is worthy of condemnation. It is also not a transgression that is socially defined or limited to tribal laws, or any relational expectations. The warning is one of dilution’s, and adulterating the quality of one’s motives, connections and ideals.

Following the current scholarship, Jesus teaches that sin is not a moral problem but a cosmological challenge to remain aligned, attuned, in sync and at one with the truth of one’s being. Such an intimacy or alignment seeks to have no gaps or dissonance between the person as the divine image and likeness and the how they function in the world is the ideal goal for our lives. To the degree that we allow for or create distance and dissonance between the divine fidei of who we are and the world’s temptations, distractions, and diseases will show what feelings and conditions that we will manifest… Separation is sin; and to the degree that we live out estranged and unconnected lives will indicate how close we are to God and to our divine image of divinity, our Christ within.

28) Then He continued and said, That is why you become sick and die, for you are deprived 29) He who has a mind to understand, let him understand.

30) Matter gave birth to a passion that has no equal, which proceeded from something contrary to nature. Then there arises a disturbance in its whole body.

31) That is why I said to you, Be of good courage, and if you are discouraged be encouraged in the presence of the different forms of nature.

32) He who has ears to hear, let him hear.

33) When the Blessed One had said this, He greeted them all, saying, Peace be with you. Receive my peace unto yourselves.

34) Beware that no one lead you astray saying Lo here or lo there! For the Son of Man is within you. 35) Follow after Him! 36) Those who seek Him will find Him. 37) Go then and preach the gospel of the Kingdom.

In sync with the teachings from John about false prophets, in Mary’s gospel we are given a warning about listening to any source- human , literary, or otherwise! We are to listen, instead, to our hearts… To our source of inner knowing such as our intuition as our most reliable guide. Because the Christ lives within each and every person, our instructions and our guidance comes from within our hearts, minds, and souls…

As you listen and become more confident in your knowing, then share this wisdom with others – teaching and encouraging them to go within for their most cherished and valued answers…

38) Do not lay down any rules beyond what I appointed you, and do not give a law like the lawgiver lest you be constrained by it.

39) When He said this He departed.

External rules, laws, obligations and structures are to be avoided as they can act to confine our potentials. Such legalisms can also preoccupy us and can be ways that lead us astray. With any pre-occupations with externals, we are draining our attention and energies away from the necessary focus and the needed energies/activities of soul development.

Chapter 5

1) But they were grieved. They wept greatly, saying, How shall we go to the Gentiles and preach the gospel of the Kingdom of the Son of Man? If they did not spare Him, how will they spare us?

2) Then Mary stood up, greeted them all, and said to her brethren, Do not weep and do not grieve nor be irresolute, for His grace will be entirely with you and will protect you.

3) But rather, let us praise His greatness, for He has prepared us and made us into Men. 4) When Mary said this, she turned their hearts to the Good, and they began to discuss the words of the Savior.

5) Peter said to Mary, Sister we know that the Savior loved you more than the rest of woman. 6) Tell us the words of the Savior which you remember which you know, but we do not, nor have we heard them.

7) Mary answered and said, What is hidden from you I will proclaim to you.

8) And she began to speak to them these words: I, she said, I saw the Lord in a vision and I said to Him, Lord I saw you today in a vision. He answered and said to me,

9) Blessed are you that you did not waver at the sight of Me. For where the mind is there is the treasure.

10) I said to Him, Lord, how does he who sees the vision see it, through the soul or through the spirit?

11) The Savior answered and said, He does not see through the soul nor through the spirit, but the mind that is between the two that is what sees the vision and it is […]

(pages 11 – 14 are missing from the manuscript)

Commentary and scholarship continues… If requested, more will be posted!

 

Don’t Sleep Through The Revolution! Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

January 9, 2015 - 9:44 am Comments Off on Don’t Sleep Through The Revolution! Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Note: This is a reprint of the invitation to give The Ware Lecture to the UUA General Assembly in 1966… the excerpts and emphasis are mine, as the text is much longer and the emphasis points are, for me, particularly cogent and inspiring…

In many ways, this address can act as a synopsis of his most foundational ideas, quotes, and teaching for us… Given that the superb film, Selma, is being released today nationwide, it acts as a strong and clear reminder of the man, his words, and his cherished ideals…

Don’t Sleep Through The Revolution!

Excerpts from The Ware Lecture by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1966…

There is nothing more tragic than to sleep through a revolution. And there can be no gainsaying of the fact that a social revolution is taking place in our world today. We see it in other nations in the demise of colonialism. We see it in our own nation, in the struggle against racial segregation and discrimination, and as we notice this struggle we are aware of the fact that a social revolution is taking place in our midst. Victor Hugo once said that there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come. The idea whose time has come today is the idea of freedom and human dignity, and so allover the world we see something of freedom explosion, and this reveals to us that we are in the midst of revolutionary times. An older order is passing away and a new order is coming into being.

The great question is, what do we do when we find ourselves in such a period? Certainly the church has a great responsibility because when the church is true to its nature, it stands as a moral guardian of the community and of society. It has always been the role of the church to broaden horizons, to challenge the status quo, and to question and break mores if necessary. I’m sure that we all agree that the church has a major role to play in this period of social change. I would like to suggest some of the things that the church must continually do in order to remain awake through this revolution.

First, we are challenged to instill within the people of our congregations a world perspective. The world in which we live is geographically one.

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All I’m saying is this: that all life is inter-related, and somehow we are all tied together. For some strange reason I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of all reality. John Donne caught it years ago and placed it in graphic terms, “No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” He goes on to say, “any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, therefore send not to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee.” This realization is absolutely necessary if we are to remain awake in this revolution.

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Secondly, it is necessary for the church to reaffirm over and over again the essential immorality of racial segregation. Any church which affirms the morality of segregation is sleeping through the revolution. We must make it clear that segregation, whether it’s in the public schools, in housing, or in recreational facilities, or in the church itself, is morally wrong and sinful. It is not only sociologically untenable, or politically unsound, or merely economically unwise, it is morally wrong and sinful.

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There is another thing that the church must do to remain awake. I thing it is necessary to refute the idea that there are superior and inferior races. We must get rid of the notion once and for all that there are superior and inferior races. It is out of this notion that the whole doctrine of white supremacy came into being, and the church must take a stand through religious education and other channels to direct the popular mind at this point, for there are some people who still believe this strange doctrine.

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It’s a strange notion that has made for a great deal of strife and suffering. Both the academic world and the disciplines of science have refuted this idea. Anthropologists like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Meade, and Herskovits, after long years of study, have made it clear that they find no evidence for the idea of superior and inferior races. There may be superior and inferior individuals in every race, but no superior or inferior races.

In spite of this, the notion still lingers around. Now, there was a time that people tried to justify it on the basis of the Bible. Strange indeed how individuals will often use, or should I say misuse, the Bible to crystallize the patterns of the status quo and justify their prejudices.

So from some pulpits it was argued that the Negro was inferior by nature because of Noah’s curse upon the children of Ham. The apostle’s dictum often became a watchword: servants, be obedient to your master. One brother had probably read the logic of the great philosopher Aristotle. You know Aristotle did a great deal to bring into being what we know now in philosophy as formal logic; and formal logic has a big word known as a syllogism, which has a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion. So this brother decided to put his argument of the inferiority of the Negro in the framework of an Aristotlian syllogism. He came out with his major premise, “All men are made in the image of God”; then came his minor premise, “God, as everybody knows, is not a Negro; therefore, the Negro is not a man.” This was the kind of reasoning that prevailed. Now, on the whole, I guess we have gotten away from this; most people don’t use the Bible and religion to justify segregation, although there are a few left. I was reading the other day where one of our white brothers in Mississippi said that God was a charter member of the White Citizens’ Council.

Today’s arguments are generally placed on more subtle cultural grounds, for instance: “the Negro is not culturally ready for integration. If you integrate the schools and other areas of life, this will pull the race back a generation.” And another: “The Negro is a criminal; you see he has the highest crime rate in any city.” So the arguments go on ad infinitum.

Those who use these arguments never say that if there are lagging standards in the Negro community – and there certainly are – they lag because of segregation and discrimination. They never go on to say that criminal responses are environmental, and not racial. Poverty, ignorance, economic deprivation, social isolation breed crime in any racial group. It is a tortuous logic to use the tragic results of segregation as an argument for the continuation of it. It is necessary to go to the causal root to deal with the problem.

So it is necessary for the church, through all of its channels of education and through all of its work, to guide the popular mind, and rid the community of the notion of superior and inferior races. We’ve all seen enough to refute this idea.

We’ve seen Negroes who have given inspiring examples of ability to rise above the shackles of a difficult environment. They have justified the conviction of the poet that “fleecy locks and black complexion cannot forfeit nature’s claim.” Skin may differ, but affection dwells in black and white the same. If I were so tall as to reach the pole or to grasp the ocean at a span, I must still be measured by my soul; the mind is the standard of the man.

The next thing that the church must do to remain awake through this revolution is to move out into the arena of social action. It is not enough for the church to work in the ideological realm, and to clear up misguided ideas. To remain awake through this social revolution, the church must engage in strong action programs to get rid of the last vestiges of segregation and discrimination. It is necessary to get rid of one or two myths if we’re really going to engage in this kind of action program.

One is the notion that legislation is not effective in bringing about the changes that we need in human relations. This argument says that you’ve got to change the heart in order to solve the problem; that you can’t change the heart through legislation. They would say you’ve got to do that through religion and education. Well, there’s some truth in this. Before we can solve these problems men and women must rise to the majestic heights of being obedient to the unenforceable. I would be the first to say this. If we are to have a truly integrated society, white persons and Negro persons and members of all groups must live together, not merely because the law says it but because it’s natural and because it’s right.

But that does not make legislation less important. It may be true that you can’t legislate integration but you can legislate desegregation. It may be true that morality cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated. It may be true that the law cannot change the heart, but it can restrain the heartless. The law cannot make a man love me, but it can restrain him from lynching me, and I think that’s pretty important also. And so while the law may not change the hearts of men, it does change the habits of men. So it is necessary for the church to support strong, meaningful civil rights legislation.

Fortunately we have seen some real advances at this point. It is very consoling to me, and I know to all of us, the role which all of the major denominations within the Protestant, the Catholic and the Jewish faiths played in the achievement of the civil rights bill of 1964, the voting rights bill of 1965. We struggled in Selma, Alabama, and in a real sense we developed right there in that little town something that the councils of the world have not been able to develop – a real ecumenical movement. Protestants, Catholics and Jews stood in Selma, and in a beautiful and meaningful way that was the ecumenical movement which created the voting rights bill.

That bill is a tribute to persons like James Reeb, Mrs. Viola Liuzzo and Jimmy Lee Jackson, those who died and suffered to make it possible. Now the President is calling for new civil rights legislation to deal with two old problems.

One is the mal-administration of justice in many sections of the South. It is necessary for all people of goodwill and for all church bodies to strongly support this bill, which will make murder or threatened assaults of civil rights workers or persons engaged in the promotion of constitutional rights a federal crime.

….

But there is a more difficult title in that bill, one that must ultimately be passed if America is to rise to its full maturity. That is the section of the bill which calls for an end to discrimination in housing. It means that discrimination in all housing will be federally non-sanctioned. It involves the sale, the rental, and the financing of all housing. This is the difficult one because there still are many fears around. There are stereotypes about Negroes, Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans and others.

Studies reveal that there are numerous forces both private and public which make for the problem, because they are profiting by the existence of segregation in housing. I am convinced that if we are to have a truly integrated society we must deal with the housing problem.

The school problem is difficult and it will never be totally solved until we solve the housing problem, and so it is my hope that we will go all out over America to bring this new legislation into being and to insist that it will be vigorously enforced, once it is passed, for there is still a gulf between legislation on the one hand and the enforcement of that legislation on the other. We see this in the South every day.

In 1954 the Supreme Court of Our nation rendered a decision declaring segregation unconstitutional in the public schools. Yet, twelve years later, only 5.2 per of the Negro students of the South are attending integrated Schools. We haven’t even made one per cent progress a year. If we continue this pace it will take about 96 more years to integrate the schools in the South. There is still a gulf between legislative and judicial decrees and the actual enforcement of them. It seems to me that an alive, relevent church should go all out to see that legislation becomes a reality and that it is vigorously enforced once it exists.

A second myth that we must deal with is that of exaggerated progress. Certainly we have made progress in race relations. And I think we can all glory that things are better today than they were ten years ago or even three years ago. We should be proud of the steps we’ve made to rid our nation of this great evil of racial segregation and discrimination.

On the other hand, we must realize the plant of freedom is only a bud and not yet a flower. The Negro is freer in 1966, but he is not yet free. The Negro knows more dignity today than he has known in any period of his history in this country, but he is not yet equal. There still are stubborn, difficult problems to deal with all over the country. I’m appalled that some people feel that the civil rights struggle is over because we have a 1964 civil rights bill with ten titles and a voting rights bill. Over and over again people ask, what else do you want? They feel that everything is all right.

Well, let them look around our big cities. I can mention one where we’re working now, not to say that it’s the worst city in the United States, but just to reveal the problem that we face.

( a descriptive summary of the current crisis in Chicago in 1966…)

Again, this is true in cities all over the country. These are stubborn, difficult problems, and yet they are problems that must be tackled, for I need not remind you of the dangers inherent therein. There is nothing more dangerous than to build a society with a large segment of individuals within that society who feel that they have no stake in it, who feel that they have nothing to lose. These are the people who will riot, these are the people who will turn their ears from pleas for non-violence. For the health of our nation, these problems must be solved. In the areas of housing, schooling, and employment there is still a great deal that must be done.

We’ve come a long, long way; we still have a long, long way to go and action programs are necessary. I’ve heard it said that the day of demonstrations is over; this is something that we hear a great deal. Well, I’m sorry that I can’t agree with that. I wish that I could say the day of demonstrations is over, but as long as these problems are with us, it will be necessary to demonstrate in order to call attention to them. I’m not saying that a demonstration is going to solve the problem of poverty, the problem of housing, the problems that we face in the schools.

It’s going to take something much more than a demonstration, but at least the demonstration calls attention to it; at least the demonstration creates a kind of constructive crisis that causes a community to see the problem and causes a community to begin moving toward the point of acting on it. The church must support this kind of demonstration. As the days unfold, I’m sure that we will need this more.

People talk about the long hot summer that’s ahead. I always say that I don’t think we have to have a long, hot violent summer. I certainly don’t want to see it because I hate violence and I don’t think it solves any problems. I think we can offset the long, hot, violent summer with the long, hot, non-violent summer. People are huddled in ghettos, living in the most crowded and depressing conditions. They need some outlet; some way to express their legitimate discontent. What is a better way than to provide non-violent channels through which they can do it? If this isn’t provided they are going to find it through more irrational, misguided means.

So the non-violent movement has a job to do, in providing the non-violent channels through which those who are caught in these conditions can express their discontent and frustration.

Now let me say that I’m still convinced that non-violence is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for freedom and human dignity. And I’d like to say just a word about this philosophy since it has been the underlying philosophy of our movement. It has power because it has a way of disarming the opponent. It exposes his moral defenses, it weakens his morale.

And at the same time it works on his heart and on his conscience, and he just doesn’t know what to do. If he doesn’t hit you, wonderful. If he hits you you develop the quiet courage of accepting blows without retaliating. If he doesn’t put you in jail, that’s very nice, nobody with any sense loves to go to jail. But if he puts you in jail you go in that jail and transform it from a dungeon of shame into a haven of freedom and human dignity.

Even if he tries to kill you, you develop the inner conviction that there are some things so precious, some things so eternally true that they are worth dying for. If a man has not discovered some thing that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live. There’s another good thing about non-violence: through it a person can use moral means to procure moral ends. There are still those who sincerely believe that the end justifies the means, no matter what the means happen to be. No matter how violent or how deceptive or anything else they are. Non-violence at its best would break with the system that argues that. Non-violence would say that the morality of the ends is implicit in the means, and that in the long-run of history destructive means cannot bring about constructive ends. So since we are working toward a just society in this movement, we should use just methods to get there. Since we are working for the end of a non-violent society in this movement, we must use non-violent means and methods to get there. Since we are working for an integrated society as an end we must work on an integrated basis on our staffs and civil rights organizations so that we don’t get to racial justice and integration through the means of black nationalism.

Another thing about this philosophy which is often misunderstood and that it says that at its best the love ethic can be a reality in a social revolution. Most revolutions in the past have been based on hope and hate, with the rising expectations of the revolutionaries implemented by hate for the perpetrators of the unjust system in the old order. I think the different thing about the revolution that has taken place in our country is that it has maintained the hope element and at the same time it has added the dimension of love. Many people would disagree with me and say that love hasn’t been there. I think we have to stop and talk about what we mean in this context because I would be the first to say that it is nonsense to urge oppressed people to love their violent oppressors in an affectionate sense. And I’m certainly not talking about that when I talk above love standing at the center of our struggle. I think it is necessary to see the meaning of love in higher terms.

The Greek language has three words for love – one is the eros, another is the word filio, and another is the word agape. I’m thinking not of eros, or of friendship as expressed in filio, but of agape, which is understanding, creative, redemptive good will for all men, an overflowing love which seeks nothing in return. When one rises to love on this level, he loves a person who does the evil deed while hating the deed. I believe that in our best moments in this struggle we have tried to adhere to this. In some strange way we have been able to stand up in the face of our most violent opponents and say, in substance, we will match your capacity to inflict suffering with our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with our soul force. Do to us what you will and we will still love you.

We cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws because non-cooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. Throw us in jail and we will still love you. Threaten our children, bomb our homes, send your hooded perpetrators of violence into our communities at the midnight hours and drag us out on some wayside road and beat us and leave us half dead; and, as difficult as it is, we will still love you.

Send your propaganda agents around the nation and make it appear we are not fit morally, culturally or otherwise for integration and we will still love you. But be assured that we will wear you down by our capacity to suffer. And one day we will win our freedom. We will not only win freedom for ourselves, we will so appeal to your heart and your conscience that we will win you in the process and our victory will be a double victory. This is our message in the non-violent movement when we are true to it.

I think it is a powerful method and I still believe in it. I know that it will lead us into that new day. Not a day when we will seek to rise from a position of disadvantage to one of advantage, thereby subverting justice. Not a day when we will substitute one tyranny for another. We know that a doctrine of black supremacy is as evil as a doctrine of white supremacy. We know that God is not interested merely in the freedom of black men and brown men and yellow men; but God is interested in the freedom of the whole human race. He is interested in the creation of a society where all men will live together as brothers and every man will respect the dignity and worth of human personality. With the non-violent method guiding us on, we can go on into that brighter day when justice will come.

I talk a great deal about the need for a kind of divine discontent. And I always mention that there are certain technical words within every science which become stereotypes and cliches. Modern psychology has a word that has become common – it is the word maladjusted. We read a great deal about it. It is a ringing cry of modern child psychology; and certainly we all want to live the well adjusted and avoid neurotic and schizophrenic personalities.

But I must say to you this evening, my friends, there are some things in our nation and in our world to which I’m proud to be maladjusted. And I call upon you to be maladjusted and all people of good will to be maladjusted to these things until the good society is realized. I never intend to adjust myself to segregation and discrimination. I never intend to become adjusted to religious bigotry . I never intend to adjust myself to economic conditions that will take necessities from the many to give luxuries to the few, and leave millions of people perishing on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of prosperity. I must honestly say, however much criticism it brings, that I never intend to adjust myself to the madness of militarism, and to the self-defeating effects of physical violence.It is no longer a choice between non-violence and violence: it is now a choice between non-violence and non-existence.

….

Yes, I must confess that I believe firmly that our world is in dire need of a new organization – the International Association for the Advancement of Creative Maladjustment. Men and women as maladjusted as the prophet Amos, who in the midst of the injustices of his day, cried out in

words that echo across the centuries – “Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.” As maladjusted as Abraham Lincoln, who had the vision to see that this nation could not survive half slave and half free. As maladjusted as Thomas Jefferson, who in the midst of an age amazingly adjusted to slavery, cried in words lifted to cosmic proportions – “We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal. That They are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” As maladjusted as Jesus of Nazareth, who could say to the men and women of his day “he who lives by the sword will perish by the sword.” Through such maladjustment we will be able to emerge from the bleak and desolate midnight of man’s inhumanity to man, into the bright and glittering daybreak of freedom and justice.

Let me say in conclusion that I have not despaired of the future. I believe firmly that we can solve this problem. I know that there are still difficult days ahead. And they are days of glorious opportunity. Our goal for America is freedom. Abused and scorned though we may be, our destiny is tied up with America’s. Before the Pilgrim fathers landed at Plymouth, we were here. Before Jefferson etched across the pages of history the words that I just quoted from the Declaration of Independence, we were here. Before the beautiful words of the Star Spangled Banner were written, we were here. For more than two centuries our forbearers labored here without wages. They made cotton king. They built the homes of their masters in the midst of the most oppressive and humiliating conditions. And yet out of a bottomless vitality they continued to grow and develop.

If the inexpressible cruelties of slavery couldn’t stop us, the opposition that we now face will surely fail. We’re going to win our freedom because both the sacred heritage of our nation and the eternal will of the almighty God are embodied in our echoing demands.

And we can sing We Shall Overcome, because somehow we know the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice. We shall overcome because Carlyle is right – “no lie can live forever.” We shall overcome because William Cullen Bryant is right – “truth crushed, will rise again.” We shall overcome because James Russell Lowell is right:

“Truth forever on the scaffold/Wrong forever on the throne/Yet that scaffold sways the future/ And behind the dim unknown/Standeth God within the shadow/Keeping watch above his own.”

With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. We will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood, and speed up that day when all of God’s children all over our nation and the world will be able to walk the earth as brothers and sisters, and then we can sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual – “Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty we are free at last.”

Thank you.

 

Reprint: Spiritual Narcissism/Spiritual Ecology Matthew Fox & Llewelyn Vaughn Lee

October 11, 2013 - 7:33 pm Comments Off on Reprint: Spiritual Narcissism/Spiritual Ecology Matthew Fox & Llewelyn Vaughn Lee

Matthew Fox & Llewelyn Vaughan-Lee:

Spiritual Narcissism / Spiritual Ecology

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Matthew Fox:Today we are discussing ecology and spirituality. Now who can deny that it doesn’t matter what your particular tradition is, or if you’re an atheist, if your backyard is burning up and you can’t plant food anymore, and the waters are rising? We’re all in trouble. And it can finally bring religions together and get over their narcissism.

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee: I hope so. Mysticism, as you know, has always held this common thread underneath religion – the union of inner experience. Part of the reason I edited the book Spiritual Ecology was to try to bring that into the ecological debate because I felt that, although it was present, it wasn’t voiced enough.
MF: Absolutely. That’s what I’ve been trying to do with the archetype of the cosmic Christ — to awaken at least Christians that crucifixion is not something that happened 2,000 years ago, it’s happening with the killing of the rainforests and the whales and the polar bears and everything else today.

LV-L: It’s happening to the Earth.

MF: To me, that not only can energize spiritual warriors to get work done today, but it also can reinvent our faith traditions themselves, which I think fall into narcissism as distinct from mysticism.

LV-L: I have a concern that somehow people who have a spiritual awakening or awareness are somehow too focused on their own individual inner spiritual journey, and to me this is a travesty of real spiritual awakening or spiritual awareness, which has to do with the whole, and this whole includes the Earth.

MF: I couldn’t agree more. If your breakthrough does not lead to transpersonal service, to compassion, to justice, including eco-justice, then I doubt its authenticity. And Jesus said it very simply, that by their fruits you’ll know them. And we can be so taken by our spiritual experiences that we don’t realize this about energizing you to serve.

LV-L: In Sufism they actually say after the station of oneness comes the state of servant-hood, that one is then in service. Sufis are known as servants.
MF: Or as Jack Kornfield put it, after ecstasy comes the laundry.

LV-L: Somehow we have become so focused on our own human journey that we’ve forgotten that this human journey is part of the Earth’s journey. There used to be, I’m sure you’re aware of this, a deeper understanding that our soul is part of the world’s soul, the anima mundi, and we’ve lost that connection. We’ve lost that understanding that our spiritual light is part of the light of the world. And we have to regain that.

MF: Right. And how the Earth story itself is part of the cosmic story.

LV-L: It’s all one. It’s all one living, breathing, inter-related, interdependent spiritual organism as much as a physical organism, and I think we have, for some extraordinary reason, forgotten that.
MF: I think there are a lot of reasons, and one of them is the anthropocentrism and the narcissism of the modern consciousness. But I also think part of it too is the beating up of matter over the centuries by theologically influential thinkers. That kind of separation, that kind of dualism is so destructive because then you think the body is secondary, and then Mother Earth is secondary, and everything else. To put things in context, we wouldn’t have our imaginations and our breath and our food and our existence without matter. Matter is not an obstacle to spirit.

LV-L: I think the early rejection of all of the Earth-based spirituality by the Christian church has left a very sad vacuum that we’re now, in a way, seeing the result of.
MF: Paying the price for. And I think it goes back, actually, to the 4th century. If you’re going to run an empire – as the church more or less inherited the empire in the 4th century, it behooves you to split matter from spirit, and also to talk about original sin, and get people confused about their own inner nobility and empowerment, and divinity, really. I think that it has served political interests and cultural power trips to split people that way.

LV-L: Well, the male domination of nature kind of took the high ground, and now we have to, in a very few years, try to redress this balance and reclaim the sacred nature of creation. And what is central to me is to try to bring that into the ecological debate because I don’t see how we can address this physical devastation of creation, this ecocide, unless we look at its spiritual roots and reconnect ourselves to the sacred nature that is the world around us.
MF: And within us. And that’s what makes deep ecology different from ecology.

Lewellyn Vaughan-Lee: The mystics teach simple things, but those  simple things change people’s worlds. How can we re-energize that  mystical perspective so we can bring it into this global arena that is  calling out to us? I mean, the Earth is calling. That’s why I called  this book Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth because the Earth is crying, the soul of the Earth is crying. We need to respond from our own soul as well as with our hands.
Matthew Fox: And, of course, Einstein said it’s from intuition and feeling that we  get values, not from the intellect. He says the intellect gives us  methods; it does not give us values. And I think when you look back at  it, this is how various traditions of monastic learning also included  the heart in some way or other.

LV-L: When you say including the heart, I would suggest something even more  radical. How can we bring our love for the Earth into the center of this  concern with the well-being of the Earth? In fact, Thich Nhat Hanh  recently said real change will only happen when we fall in love with our  planet. As a mystic, I believe in the primacy of love, and we have  this love for the Earth. It is so generous. It has given us life. It has  given us breath. It has given us water. And we have treated it so badly  in response. I feel that this mystical center of divine love is really  the power behind the planet, because it is really what gives life to us  all. I mean, it’s a really radical thought to bring that essential  quality into the ecological debate. And although we have this  physical responsibility, how can we bring this love that belongs also to  our sense of the sacred? How can we learn once again to live in love  with the Earth in the way we live, in our daily activities so that  everything becomes imbued with this sense of the sacred? One can  educate the mind, but also we somehow have been stripped of the power of  love, which is, as a mystic, the greatest power in creation.
MF: In our traditions, certainly the Jewish tradition but also Aquinas, it  is said too that the mind resides in the heart. We don’t have to, how  should I say, pit one against the other. That real heart knowledge –  when you’re really in love with something, you want to learn more about  it.

LV-L: Also the heart and the mind in the heart see the oneness in things.  Sufis say when the eye of the heart is open—the Sufis talk about the eye  of the heart—then in each atom there are a million secrets. And we see  the unity in life, in everything that we are part of. We need to reclaim  that unity, that oneness, because life is dying and it’s dying because  we split spirit and matter, we separated ourselves from creation. The  analytic mind tries to split everything up into smaller and smaller  pieces. We need to return to this oneness, this awareness of the  interdependence of all of life, this web of life, which our ancestors  knew and revered so deeply. Somehow we have lost connection with  this spiritual dimension of creation, and to me that is the root of our  present ecological imbalance because we don’t respect or revere  creation as our ancestors and indigenous peoples have always done. And  somehow, as you say, the mystics have held this thread in the West, but  a thread is no longer enough. It needs to be a revolution, a revolution  of the heart, a revolution of consciousness that sees the oneness that  is within and all around us. I suppose the challenge is, how do we give  this back to humanity, this forgotten treasure, this secret, this deep  awareness of the real nature of creation, that it is not dead matter? I  always say the world is not a problem to be solved, it’s a living being  to be related to, and it is calling to us. It needs our attention, not  just of our minds, but also of our hearts. It is our own awakened  consciousness that can heal the Earth.

Matthew Fox: Another   dimension, I think, including when it comes to the love, is grief. We   don’t deal well with grief in our culture, and that’s one reason I  think  anger gets battered all over the walls. We don’t deal with anger  in a  constructive way very often. I do a lot of grief  ceremonies – we  need practices and rituals. When grief builds up, when  you can’t deal  with grief, not only does anger build up, but also the  joy and love get  clouded over, and people feel disempowered. So I think  grief work is a  part. What can I say? Who cannot be grieving  today about what’s  happening to the Earth? You’d have to be extremely  busy covering up your  grief and putting a lot of energy there.

Lewellyn Vaughan-Lee: I think we do. We’re a culture of mass distractions. We try to avoid at all costs seeing the real fruits of our actions. I   would say the most important practice is to listen. Thich Nhat Hanh   said to heal the Earth, listen to its cry because the Earth is crying,   but we don’t know how to listen. We’ve forgotten this feminine wisdom of  deep listening. If there is deep ecology, there is deep listening. We   have to relearn this feminine wisdom of listening to the Earth. It is  so  old, it is so wise, it has been through many crises before, and we  need  to cooperate. Thomas Berry said we are only talking to   ourselves; we are not talking to the rivers; we are not listening to the   winds and stars; we have broken the great conversation. By breaking  that conversation we have shattered the universe. And we have to learn  again how to listen to the Earth, and how to open that ear of the heart.   We have been told this great lie that we are separate from the Earth,   that it is something out there. It is not out there, we are part of the   Earth. We are made of stardust. We need to feel the grief  within  our own self for the Earth and learn to listen to the Earth,  learn to  hear it, learn to re-attune ourselves, just like the shamans  did of old,  just like the wise people who listened to the wind, who  listened to the  rivers, who felt the heartbeat of creation. And it  might not sound very  practical but it has a deep, deep wisdom within  it, and I think we need  all the help we can get at the moment.
MF: Absolutely. And that’s where the world’s spiritual traditions, if they   get out of their anthropocentric, reptilian brain dimension of wanting   to conquer each other and be number one or something gets shaken down,   and as you say, bring this feminine dimension back, the receptivity and   contemplation and silence.

LV-L: And not to rush for a quick fix, because I don’t think we can quickly   fix this environmental crisis. It has been building up for centuries.
MF: I do think that the patriarchal mindset feeds the reptilian brain excessively, whereas, I think the real way to treat the reptilian brain  is to learn to meditate and be still, because reptiles like to lie low  and in the sun… We have to make room for that mammal brain, which is  half as old as the reptilian brain in us, which is the brain of  compassion and the brain of kinship and family, and also of getting   along with the rest of nature.

LV-L: This is what Chief Oren Lyons said (in the book), when he spoke about  our original  instructions in the Native American tradition. He said one  of the  original instructions is we have to get along together. And  it’s very  simple, but once you realize we are one living community and  we can only  survive as one living community, it’s very fundamental.  It’s not  sophisticated, but we seem to have forgotten it, that we are  part of  this living, interdependent, interwoven organism that is all  around us  and that we are part of. I think we have a duty, any  of us who  have an awareness of this, to bring this into the forefront,  to claim  it; not to allow this dark side of our civilization to devour  all the  light. That’s why when you spoke about religious narcissism,  and I spoke  about my concern that spiritually awakened people are just  using their  own light for their own inner spiritual journey or their  own image of  spiritual progress, we have to make a relationship between  our light and  the world which is hungry for this light.

And there used  to be always  this relationship between the light of the individual  soul and the light  of the world’s soul, and somehow we need to  reconnect with this Earth  on a very deep, foundational, spiritual  basis. We are part of one  spiritual journey, one life journey, one  evolution, and our soul and the  soul of the world are not separate, and  we have to reclaim this  connection. And somehow, as you say,  human spirituality and  religion became narcissistic, and that was never  the intention because  Christ’s love was for the world; the Buddha’s  peace was for the world.  The message is always for the whole.
MF: I think today a lot of young people are being caught up in the vocation   of re-sacralizing the Earth, but doing it through everything from the way we eat and farm to the way we do business and politics.

LV-L: It’s   the attitude that we bring to it. It’s always the attitude. If we come   in the deepest sense, with an attitude of prayer or even just respect   and reverence for each other, for the Earth, for what is around us,  then  the healing can begin, and the forces of darkness will recede. But  we  will wait and see.
Matthew Fox was described by Thomas Berry as possibly the “most creative, comprehensive & challenging religious-spiritual teacher in America”.  Llewelyn Vaughan-Lee is a Sufi mystic & successor of Irina Tweedie who brought the Naqshbandiyya-Mujaddidiyya Indian Sufi Order to the West. This exchange of views was sponsored by Bioneers.  Publ. here 10.9.2013.